Over on…

Over on Urban Monk, Albert writes about Acceptance. Albert’s style is personal and warm. Acceptance is important; my turn-around started with the complete acceptance of depression and anxiety. At that time, the acceptance came not from wisdom, but from sheer exhaustion. I was tired of the struggle. The letting go of all judgment about depression, suddenly and unexpectedly brought about the change that had eluded me in my years of struggle.

Over on In 2 Deep, Davidya, a few days ago, wrote about the Ramayana and suggested a link to an beautifully crafted, funny animated movie. The Ramayana, along with the Mahabharta, are two of India’s ancient literary giants. They are epic poems, similar to the Greek Illiad and Odyssey. The Illiad is some 14000 verses; the Ramayana is 24000 and the Mahabharata is a whopping 50000. Their beauty is not in their length but in the capture of the human ego and spirit. The heroes and gods in these epics are subject to all the usual and unusual problems and foibles and ‘badness’ that we know as human beings. Here’s more on this poignant animated movie:

http://www.thirteen.org/sites/reel13/blog/watch-sita-sings-the-blues-online/347/

Sita is a goddess separated from her beloved Lord and husband Rama. Nina is an animator whose husband moves to India, then dumps her by e-mail. Three hilarious shadow puppets narrate both ancient tragedy and modern comedy in this beautifully animated interpretation of the Indian epic Ramayana. Set to the 1920’s jazz vocals of Annette Hanshaw, Sita Sings the Blues earns its tagline as “The Greatest Break-Up Story Ever Told.”

Over on the Peaceful Self, Mike and I got into a discussion on “specialized concepts.” Mike is good at deconstructing the ego’s tricks. In the awakening process at some point we realize that the very concepts and beliefs that may have made sense and helped us along are now obstacles. Sometimes it’s the opposite, some ideas that did not make sense before begin to make sense. Change comes rapidly. At some point we learn to break our love of ideas and beliefs and spirituality and books and traditions and icons and simply decide to enjoy experiences in Awareness. This effortless experiencing, without judgment or analysis, is what I call direct experience.

For a good laugh, visit Monk Mojo’s 50 ways to kill your ego.

Awareness and Release…

6 thoughts on “Over on…

  1. MonkMojo

    Hi Kaushik,
    Your thoughts on depression resonate with me. I went through about six years of that nasty stuff. It about killed me. The exhaustion you mention was mind-blow for me. It looks as if we got something out of it, perspective perhaps.

    1. Kaushik Post author

      Andrew Solomon in the Noon Day Daemon writes that depression is the opposite of love. It’s a pip. But you’re right, we do get something out of it; it encourages us to look inside. A lot of what I have written and will post is about recovery through awakening. Thanks for you thoughts.

    1. Kaushik Post author

      hmmm, let’s see, the urban dictionary defines it variously as “pain in the ass”, “a real character”, and “seeds.” Google is all over the place on it, and it sounds like it would be used for fictional characters. I think I meant it solidly as a pain-in-the-ass that’s difficult to deal with.

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